Wren (Troglodytidae)

BIRDS / PERCHING BIRDS /

Wrens are medium-small to very small birds. The Eurasian wren is among the smallest birds in its range, while the smaller species from the Americas are among the smallest passerines in that part of the world. They range in size from the white-bellied wren, which averages under 10 cm (3.9 in) and 9 g (0.32 oz), to the giant wren, which averages about 22 cm (8.7 in) and weighs almost 50 g (1.8 oz). The dominating colors of their plumage are generally drab, composed of gray, brown, black, and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. No sexual dimorphism is seen in the plumage of wrens, and little difference exists between young birds and adults. All have fairly long, straight to marginally decurved bills.

Eurasian wren (Troglodytes troglodytes)  Resident
Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) Copyright Peter Drury

Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes)
Copyright Peter Drury

The Eurasian wren (Troglodytes troglodytes), is a very small bird, and the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae found in Eurasia and Africa (Maghreb). In Anglophone Europe, it is commonly known simply as the wren.

The 9- to 10.5-cm-long and 6-10 g wren is rufous brown above, greyer beneath, barred with darker brown and grey, even on wings and tail. The bill is dark brown, the legs pale brown. Young birds are less distinctly barred.

This small, stump-tailed wren is almost as familiar in Europe as the robin. It is mouse-like, easily lost sight of when it is hunting for food, but is found everywhere from the tops of the highest moors to the sea coast.

For the most part insects and spiders are its food, but in winter large pupae are taken and some seeds.

Where these can be seen: This bird often can be heard but not seen. During the spring/summer it can be found on the top of bushes declaring its territory. A beautiful song, one you could listen to for quite some time and maybe be rewarded with a sighting.

 Wren Gallery